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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
in ohio right now? chief national correspondent john king has some answers. >> well, anderson, that narrow ohio lead for the president is within the poll's sampling error but it is yet another poll showing the president with a small persistent lead in the state of ohio. let's take a closer look at why it is happening in this state that is so important in the pick for president. here's the main reason right here. governor romney gets the republicans. the president gets the democrats but at the moment, in our survey, the president has a narrow lead among ohio voters who define themselves as independents. that is the battleground in a big battleground state, if you win the independents you are likely to win. governor romney close but the president with an important edge among independent voters. there's also an age divide, if you look at likely voters in ohio. among voters under the age of 50, there's a big gap, 18 point lead for the president among voters under the age of 50. a smaller lead for governor romney among voters 50 and older so the republicans are withstanding the attacks on the r
of the campaign. now there is concern the power outages caused by the storm could affect voting. john king, what have you been finding on that question? we've been hearing that question from more and more people. >> let's hope with six days to go, five full days to work that utility officials and state and local officials get most of this fixed. if you look at the map the areas that are not green have been impacted by superstorm sandy when it comes to power outages. deb feyerick was talking about the new york city area. the darker the color the higher number of people without power. new york you move down to the state of new jersey, incredibly hard hit along the shoreline. we know new york and new jersey likely to go democratic. let's walk over to the state of pennsylvania and look at this, you see this down here, let me help you understand this chart a little bit. i'm going to pop it out and this explains the darker the color the higher the number of people without power so as we come back to the state of pennsylvania i want to show you something. if you look it's obvious to the naked eye in th
increasingly important presidential battleground. we're talking about the commonwealth of virginia. john king spent some time there talking to people and poll sters. >> if you look at the map miguel is in colorado that's one of the red states the president turned blue. if you lo at the map you see all this red. how did obama win last time? he woven it from all of them right here in fast growing northern virginia. >> reporter: urgency in a place once reliably red. >> this is the republican party in virginia. >> mitt romney's path to the white house runs through virginia and to win it he must run strong within an hour's drive of washington. >> it's all about northern virginia. there have been so many people from the northeast, from decratic areas, that they have turned a solid red state into a purple state. >> reporter: recent polls show a dead heat. >> if you look at the dozen polls in virginia taken before the first presidential debate on october 3rd, obama was ahead in all 12. if you look at the eight polls taken after the first presidential debate, romney was ahead in 6 out of the 8. and it
of sandy and also because of his statements made in the primary debates when he was questioned by john king. so this situation is not looking too good for mitt romney right now. an these are valid reporter questions, correct? >> yeah, look, i think all questions are valid whether the campaign thinks so or not. i'm not going to sit here and justify governor romney's comments on fema. what i think he was trying to say is any time you get a federal agency and give them more money and power to the states, they do it better. i can be -- i can say that when i was in the governor's office here in tennessee. our emergency management team did such a better job dealing with tornados and the things we had to deal with on the ground. fema was this very large federal agency. i don't think it's appropriate for governor romney and i think the campaign is making the riot call to talk about any criticism of fema right now because we're all in this together. he's trying to do everything he can to help. he's kind of got a very tough line to kind of cross and straddle in the fact that he can't come out and cri
to be held to that in the presidency. >> let's be clear, too, john king said even disaster relief and romney sort of mowed over that, i don't know whether -- >> oh, yeah. >> that was an acknowledgement even in the case of disaster relief we would turn this over to the states or private sector. chris christie has given president obama a warm embrace and maybe in so doing has validated the notion that government has a role to play. we got word that jeb bush added his -- threw his hat in the ring as far as the role of federal government, he is no stranger to disaster in florida being the former governor there. my experience in all this emergency response business it is the local level and state level that really matters, that if they do their job right the federal government part works out pretty good. trying to shift the onus -- not the onus but the job on to the state and local level which, of course, is more in line with republican priorities as far as spending is it not? >> i think that's right. the broad vision of the romney budget if you take almost everything you can think of in the fede
in that primary debate that john king moderated where he was asked specifically about fema. he said anything that the federal government does that can be transferred to the states are better yet to the private sector. that's the right direction. so it leaves open the question of exactly what role he sees for fema. fema has been a controversial agency such as their delivery of services after katrina. however it's pretty popular when it comes in and helps and picks up the costs in the aftermath of disasters like this one. so i think it's a question that i would expect governor romney feel that he needs to say some words about. maybe today about what role he would see for the federal government for fema if he were president in natural disasters like this one. >> all this goes back to what mitt romney said in one of the early primary debates. i want to play that now. >> every time you have an occasion, you take something from the federal government and send it back to the states, that's the right direction. if you can go even further and send it back to the private sector, that's even better. we
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)